TOP 5 BOOKS: ESSENTIAL READING FOR DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKERS /STUDENTS

The following list features five of the best books I have encountered during my studies. They are the books I would recommend any film student to acquire as they make valuable additions to any film buff’s library. As well as offering a comprehensive history of non-fiction film making, the codes and conventions of documentaries many of the books also provide insight into the mind of documentary directors.

Documentary Superstars: Marsha McCreadie

Documentary Superstars takes an in depth look at how documentary trends have evolved over the years, from cinema vérité to on-screen auteurs. The book features exclusive interviews from  Michael Moore, Albert Maysles, Lauren Greenfield, Henry Corra and Errol Morris.

Directing the Documentary: Michael Rabiger

This book was on the top of my MA course reading list, some say it is the best book ever written about film making. In this extensive guide,  it’s nearly 600 pages, Rabiger provides an in-depth analysis of the both the creative and practical implications of production. The book is filled with advice and resources for documentary filmmakers, including guidance on grant writing and fundraising, proposals and pitching. It also has a companion site that has a wide variety of resources including online film examples and production checklists.

Introduction to Documentary: Bill Nichols

If you have done any academic study on documentary it is highly likely Bill Nichols is a name you will recognise. His writing is very accessible, he breaks down several traits and conventions of documentary styles into a conceptual scheme he calls ‘modes’: the observational mode, reflexive mode, participatory mode, reflective mode and expository mode.  Whilst it would be impossible to fit every film perfectly into one of the six categories, these categories help scholars and makers alike understand different approaches filmmakers take to share their stories.   I believe this is the perfect book for someone looking to broaden their understanding of documentary form.

This Much is True : James Quinn 

Each chapter in this book is centered around a different part of the film making process and features an essay from some of, arguably, the best documentary filmmakers of all time. Nick Broomfield, Albert Maysles, Kim Longinotto and Asaf Kapadia are just some of the contributors to the book.

The book is more personal than the others on the list and features a more conversational style. I would recommend this book to somebody looking to gain insight into how well established documentarians think.

John Grierson: Life, Contributions – by Jack C Ellis 

John Grierson is thought of as the father of the non-fiction genre. ‘Documentary’ was actually a term he coined when talking about ‘Moana‘ a 1926 film directed by Robert Flaherty, not the Disney animation. This book is the only biography included on the list. It includes information about Grierson’s career and offers insight into the true contributions he made to documentaries.

 

Advertisements

Top 5 Archive Documentaries

Archive material can be used in so many creative and innovative ways. Here is a break down of the best archive documentaries out there, some of the techniques they use and where to watch them.

5: HyperNormalisation’ (2016)

Director Adam Curtis is known for his blend of authoritative voice over, hypnotic music and juxtaposing archive footage and ‘Hypernormalisation’ is no exception. In his exploration of the ‘fake world’ we now live in, Curtis uses contrasting archive footage to illustrate his essay and to create new meaning. While the tone of his narration is closer to a news story, it lacks the same objectivity.  It places him in a position of authority resulting in audiences being more likely to accept what he says as the truth, despite a lack of hard evidence.

Available on BBC iPlayer or in full on Youtube

4: ‘Notes on Blindness’ (2016)

Built around Professor John Hull’s audio diary tapes, ‘Notes on Blindness’ depicts the emotional impact the deterioration of sight has on Hull and his family.

The film utilises dramatic reconstructions alongside the original audio from Hull’s tapes, rather than voice over from a talking head interview. This allows for a more immersive cinematic experience and audiences are made to feel more connected to Hull and his wife, Marilyn.

Available on Amazon and Netflix 

4:Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief‘ (2015)

Adapted from the 2013 Pulitzer-Prize winning book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief, the documentary explores the secret world and the inner dealings of the Church of Scientology.

Director, Alex Gibney, provides an in-depth history of the church and in doing so presents the reasons in which people feel compelled to join.

Through the use of archive footage, some modern B-roll and talking head interviews with a number of former members of Scientology audiences are shown what happens to members as they try to leave the Church.

It is, in my opinion, the best film about Scientology out there.

Available in full on Youtube

2: ‘Cobain: Montage of Heck’ (2015)

Montage of Heck is an example of expertly utilising access. As he was approached by the subject of the film’s widow, Courtney Love, director Brett morgen had access to never before seen home footage and photographs, unheard songs from Nirvana’s archive and Cobain’s artwork and journals. Along with talking head interviews with friends and family and stylised animation the film shines a new light on the life of the music legend.

Available on Netflix  and in full on Youtube

1: Amy (2015)

Asif Kapadia’s ‘Amy’ is built up of archive footage of the star with the audio from interviews with those who know her best, including her father Mitch and her muse/ex-husband Blake. The director uses the lyrics Winehouse wrote as a narrative map to tell her story. The words she wrote reveal more about the inner workings of her mind than the other narrative devices.

The film is remarkable and will captivate audiences, whether you’re a fan of her music or otherwise.

Available on Amazon and in full on Youtube

 

 

Why are Archive Documentaries Important?

Documentary film has always had a complex relationship with archive material and archival practices.

In the 20th century media texts, such as television programmes, were transitory. It was assumed that a programme would air once, maybe twice if you were lucky, and then never be seen again by the public. However, the internet’s prominence in our lives has changed these once transitory texts into objects of permanence. Audiences now assume that once published, texts should be available to be revisited, resold and engaged with. Platforms like Youtube, Netflix and BBC iPlayer make this possible. The online library becomes some what of an archive in and of itself, allowing media texts to have an afterlife.

Archive has historic, educational and entertainment value however it needs technological, creative and curatorial skills to be able to unlock its full potential. The internet encourages publishing material and then connecting to audiences and similar texts. So you could argue that TV frameworks are becoming outdated.

If you consider another creative medium, such as music, you do not think of music from the past to be ‘archive music’. A song from the 1950’s is not considered to be ‘archive’, it is thought of as an album to be enjoyed in the present, perhaps even added to a playlist amongst recently created music. This framework encourages the integration of relevant material from both the past and the present for audiences to enjoy. It is interesting to consider what kind of digital innovation will be necessary to get archive film to be handled in the same way. Continue reading “Why are Archive Documentaries Important?”

Working with Archive Film

Here is an exercise we had to complete for my course:

Working with Archive exercise – Diane Di Prima: Women of the Beat Generation from Elizabeth-Valentina on Vimeo.

Using only footage/interviews and music from other sources we had to produce a 2 minute short film on a topic of our choice. As a result, I do not own any of to footage or audio featured in this video.

In my research I found a great zine called BEATDOM . Each issue is themed and full of essays from academics, fans and creative writers with unique perspectives of the writers of the Beat Generation.  Themes include, the contribution of women to the literary movement and the Beat’s drug and alcohol (ab)use.

Continue reading “Working with Archive Film”

Life on Two Spectrums

As part of my course at UCL I recently completed a short observational film called ‘Life on Two Spectrums’. It is a short documentary project looking at the experiences of members of the LGBTQ+ community with Autism and Asperger’s syndrome. The film follows Dan ‘Tia Anna’ Kahn, a drag queen with Asperger’s Syndrome who founded A.S.P.E.C.S (Autistic and Aspergers Persons of Every Category of (Queer) Sexuality) a support and networking group to help address the needs of the neurodiverse members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Watch below or at https://vimeo.com/199202763

Life on Two Spectrums: Autism and the LGBTQ+ community. from Elizabeth-Valentina on Vimeo.

King Doc UK

kk

Our latest production is in full swing and we will be filming in the last week of this month (January).

We asked drag kings and academics from around the world to tell us more about what drag performance means to them…

The documentary will explore the resilient spirit of the people who perform masculinity on stage. If you don’t already know, Drag Kings are male impersonators, often women, who embody the mannerisms of men. Our film will follow myself and a young performing drag king, Benjamin Butch, as we uncover the core reasons that performers choose gender impersonation as a form of artistic expression. Other contributors will include drag kings Sammy Silver and Wolfy .

We have 9 days left to raise the rest of our budget and we are offering a variety of fabulous reward in return for donations. If you would like to support us please visit: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1300988717/king-doc-uk-a-short-film-about-the-uks-drag-kings?ref=discovery .

We are also hosting a drag night in my university town of York, in a wonderful LGBTQ+ friendly venue Thomas’s of York . If you are in the area and would like to attend your name can be added to the guest list as a ‘reward’ for donating.

b@t

While the film project is still dragging on…. You can follow our progress (and see pictures from the event) on our social media pages.

Find us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook using the hash tag #kingdocuk for updates on the project!

Short Sighted: Are Short Films the new TV Pilot?

     James M. Johnston’s Short Melville premiered at the 2015 SXSW Festival

Just when I was beginning to think Short films no longer served as a calling card in the industry I find out about James M. Johnston’s short film Melville. A short character study about a man who is withdrawn from life and his personal struggle to become a hip-hop star. The film stunned audiences at the 2015 SXSW Festival and caught the eye of Michael Strahan and Constance Schwartz, the co-founder of SMAC Entertainment. The short is currently in development to become a television series.

Short films getting picked up for TV is not a new phenomenon. Though rare, it has happened many times before. An example of this is animated series South Park. The series is spawned from a short film called  ‘The Spirit of Christmas:Jesus vs. Frosty’ which was created in 1992. Now, this is not to say that anyone who makes a short will be picked up by a TV Network but it is one way short films are getting new talent noticed. As well as having a unique and interesting idea and getting your film seen by the right people, a certain amount of luck is also needed. After receiving the best animation award at the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Jesus vs Frosty caught the attention of Fox executive Brian Graden, who offered Stone and Parker $1,000 to create another short as a video Christmas Card. This then circulated around on the internet and bootleg video. Comedy Central then caught on and two years after their second short the South Park series aired and 19 episodes later, it’s still causing controversy.