Top 5 Archive Documentaries

Archive material can be used in so many creative and innovative ways. Here is a break down of the best archive documentaries out there, some of the techniques they use and where to watch them.

5: HyperNormalisation’ (2016)

Director Adam Curtis is known for his blend of authoritative voice over, hypnotic music and juxtaposing archive footage and ‘Hypernormalisation’ is no exception. In his exploration of the ‘fake world’ we now live in, Curtis uses contrasting archive footage to illustrate his essay and to create new meaning. While the tone of his narration is closer to a news story, it lacks the same objectivity.  It places him in a position of authority resulting in audiences being more likely to accept what he says as the truth, despite a lack of hard evidence.

Available on BBC iPlayer or in full on Youtube

4: ‘Notes on Blindness’ (2016)

Built around Professor John Hull’s audio diary tapes, ‘Notes on Blindness’ depicts the emotional impact the deterioration of sight has on Hull and his family.

The film utilises dramatic reconstructions alongside the original audio from Hull’s tapes, rather than voice over from a talking head interview. This allows for a more immersive cinematic experience and audiences are made to feel more connected to Hull and his wife, Marilyn.

Available on Amazon and Netflix 

4:Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief‘ (2015)

Adapted from the 2013 Pulitzer-Prize winning book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief, the documentary explores the secret world and the inner dealings of the Church of Scientology.

Director, Alex Gibney, provides an in-depth history of the church and in doing so presents the reasons in which people feel compelled to join.

Through the use of archive footage, some modern B-roll and talking head interviews with a number of former members of Scientology audiences are shown what happens to members as they try to leave the Church.

It is, in my opinion, the best film about Scientology out there.

Available in full on Youtube

2: ‘Cobain: Montage of Heck’ (2015)

Montage of Heck is an example of expertly utilising access. As he was approached by the subject of the film’s widow, Courtney Love, director Brett morgen had access to never before seen home footage and photographs, unheard songs from Nirvana’s archive and Cobain’s artwork and journals. Along with talking head interviews with friends and family and stylised animation the film shines a new light on the life of the music legend.

Available on Netflix  and in full on Youtube

1: Amy (2015)

Asif Kapadia’s ‘Amy’ is built up of archive footage of the star with the audio from interviews with those who know her best, including her father Mitch and her muse/ex-husband Blake. The director uses the lyrics Winehouse wrote as a narrative map to tell her story. The words she wrote reveal more about the inner workings of her mind than the other narrative devices.

The film is remarkable and will captivate audiences, whether you’re a fan of her music or otherwise.

Available on Amazon and in full on Youtube

 

 

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Why are Archive Documentaries Important?

Documentary film has always had a complex relationship with archive material and archival practices.

In the 20th century media texts, such as television programmes, were transitory. It was assumed that a programme would air once, maybe twice if you were lucky, and then never be seen again by the public. However, the internet’s prominence in our lives has changed these once transitory texts into objects of permanence. Audiences now assume that once published, texts should be available to be revisited, resold and engaged with. Platforms like Youtube, Netflix and BBC iPlayer make this possible. The online library becomes some what of an archive in and of itself, allowing media texts to have an afterlife.

Archive has historic, educational and entertainment value however it needs technological, creative and curatorial skills to be able to unlock its full potential. The internet encourages publishing material and then connecting to audiences and similar texts. So you could argue that TV frameworks are becoming outdated.

If you consider another creative medium, such as music, you do not think of music from the past to be ‘archive music’. A song from the 1950’s is not considered to be ‘archive’, it is thought of as an album to be enjoyed in the present, perhaps even added to a playlist amongst recently created music. This framework encourages the integration of relevant material from both the past and the present for audiences to enjoy. It is interesting to consider what kind of digital innovation will be necessary to get archive film to be handled in the same way. Continue reading “Why are Archive Documentaries Important?”

Working with Archive Film

Here is an exercise we had to complete for my course:

Working with Archive exercise – Diane Di Prima: Women of the Beat Generation from Elizabeth-Valentina on Vimeo.

Using only footage/interviews and music from other sources we had to produce a 2 minute short film on a topic of our choice. As a result, I do not own any of to footage or audio featured in this video.

In my research I found a great zine called BEATDOM . Each issue is themed and full of essays from academics, fans and creative writers with unique perspectives of the writers of the Beat Generation.  Themes include, the contribution of women to the literary movement and the Beat’s drug and alcohol (ab)use.

Continue reading “Working with Archive Film”